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Xi says US trying to trick China into invading Taiwan

Chinese leader Xi Jinping once accused the U.S. of trying to trick China into invading Taiwan. That’s according to a Financial Times report, which cited sources familiar with the matter. It said Xi made the claim last April, during a meeting with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen. Washington has denied the allegation.

Matthew Miller
US state department spokesperson
That’s certainly not accurate. We have made clear, including directly, to senior members of the Chinese government, that our “one China” policy has not changed. It will not change. And we continue to urge calm and stability across the Taiwan Strait.

John Kirby
White House national security communications adviser
It’s bogus for one. There’s absolutely no truth to it. I can’t get into Mr. Xi’s head and figure out where, who’s giving him his talking points, or where it’s coming from. It’s just not true.

Wang Liang-yu
MOFA Dept. of North American Affairs
We, the U.S., and other likeminded nations have long discussed how to maintain peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait. The situation we have on hand is that one party is seeking pretexts to change the status quo. I think that the international community knows very well who is taking such actions.

U.S. officials rejected the claim that the U.S. wants China to invade Taiwan. Experts say it’s possible that Xi himself believes it, which suggests that the information being given to him is being “warped.” It’s also possible that the comment is part of China’s cognitive warfare, they say.

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Time:2024-06-18

最新消息 Latest News

US buys up drones for ‘Hellscape,’ outgoing AIT director gives parting advice

Outgoing AIT Director Sandra Oudkirk has some parting advice. Speaking to the New York Times, she said that many Taiwanese had become desensitized to the Chinese threat. She said, “Avoid panic about China’s combative language and moves, but don’t grow numb to the risks.” The warning comes as details emerge about the U.S. military’s strategy for defending Taiwan.

President Lai Ching-te welcomed a high-level delegation from the Atlantic Council think tank on Tuesday. At their reception, he reiterated the importance of cooperation among democratic countries.

Lai Ching-te
President
Taiwan, the U.S., Latvia, and the Czech Republic all know the value of freedom and democracy, and they all face the challenges of authoritarianism. We understand deeply that democratic nations must join hands in cooperation, so as to safeguard global peace and stability. The administration that I lead will proactively pursue value-based diplomacy and deepen partnerships with democratic countries.

The world is watching the Taiwan Strait, which is considered a main geopolitical flashpoint. In a recent interview with the Washington Post, the U.S.’ top military commander in Asia gave details on “Hellscape,” America’s drone-based strategy against a Chinese attack on Taiwan. According to the report, the U.S. defense department has been buying and developing drone weapons under its Replicator Initiative. Dozens of projects are in progress, with the goal of building a powerful strike force that can buy time for the U.S. to come to Taiwan’s aid.

Kathleen Hicks (September 2023)
Deputy secretary of defense
We’ve set a big goal for replicator: to field attritable, autonomous systems at a scale of multiple thousands, in multiple domains within the next 18 to 24 months.

In a New York Times interview, outgoing AIT Director Sandra Oudkirk said that after decades of aggression from China, many Taiwanese people have become desensitized. Despite the escalation in Chinese military drills and airspace intrusions, there’s rarely public alarm. Oudkirk had some parting advice: “Avoid panic about China’s combative language and moves, but don’t grow numb to the risks.”

Wellington Koo
Defense minister
China is constantly attempting unilateral changes to the status quo through its “salami slicing” strategy. Avoid panic but don’t grow numb. We very much agree with this advice. We must stay calm and rational, and we must respond to incidents in the Taiwan Strait appropriately. We will not provoke, but we also call on China not to be a troublemaker.

China has never renounced the use of force against Taiwan. As the world grows concerned over Beijing, Taiwan must race to strengthen its defense capabilities.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
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2024-06-18

German firms raise NT$274,500 for children with critical illnesses

The German Trade Office hosted a soccer tournament, bringing together 16 German companies to raise money for Make-A-Wish Foundation. The GTO German Company Charity Soccer Tournament raised NT$274,500 for children with critical illnesses. FTV reporter Stephany Yang has the details.

The Taipei Gymnasium has been transformed into an indoor soccer field. The gym echoes with loud cheers.

This is the annual GTO German Company Charity Soccer Tournament. Every time a team scores, NT$1,500 will be donated to the “Make a Wish Foundation."

Christian Peluso
Tianmu United
We did try to do some practice on a small pitch. It was different. It was not indoors. It was outdoors. We participate in a charity tournament and we feel that the main goal is to score as many goals as we can.

Patrick Kemnitz
Trumpf managing director
We are joining for the second time for this very exciting charity soccer event. We try to do our best, and most important fair play. We are company from Germany so of course we have many employees interested in playing soccer for a good purpose.

This event was organized by the German Trade Office with support from Taipei’s Department of Sports, A Star Academy, and Lumiere International Academy. Sixteen German companies in Taiwan competed in the tournament to raise funds for the Make-A-Wish Foundation Taiwan, which helps to fulfill the wishes of children battling critical illnesses between the ages of 3-18 years old.

Leonie Yang
German Trade Office Taipei head
We already do CSR Day in Taiwan for quite some time. We go to Taiwanese elementary schools and we bring them some activities to learn about Germany or some sports activities as well. Last year, we thought it would also be good to have this soccer tournament and to combine it more with all the charity aspect and really donate to the foundations here in Taiwan. This is the second year.

Flora Hsu
Make-A-Wish Foundation CEO
According to the data released by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, every year, there are approximately more than 500 new children diagnosed with childhood cancer. There are about more than 500 children with cancer alone. Then our services do not include children with cancer, and there are cancers including brain tumors, tumors, osteosarcoma, etc., as well as children with organ transplants, kidney transplants, etc. We also serve children with rare diseases.

Bosch Taiwan came in first place. Taiwan United came second, followed by the German Trade Office in third place. NT$274,500 was raised during the event. Through the soccer tournament, the German Trade Office and German companies hope to contribute to Taiwanese society.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
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2024-06-18

Malaysian media praises Taiwan’s Muslim-friendly travel industry

A Malaysian news outlet recently named Taiwan a Muslim-friendly travel destination. It’s not just about having halal food. Hotels also have amenities especially for Muslim visitors. Taiwan has actually been catering to Muslim travelers for over a decade now, with more than 400 certified restaurants and hotels.

Generously spiced chicken sizzles on a skillet, both sounding and smelling enticing. This Indian biryani with turmeric features firm long-grain rice paired with tender chicken. Mutton curry with naan is also a classic. And all of it is halal.

Ms. Lee
Halal restaurant owner
Our beef and mutton is all imported. For the chicken, we have our own halal butcher. Halal food can’t have any alcohol in it, so we cook with only spices and natural ingredients.

A recent news report from Malaysia named Taiwan a Muslim-friendly destination. Starting in 2019, Taiwan has also been ranked in the top three on the global Muslim Travel Index for non-OIC destinations, and has been voted the most accommodating destination of the year. It earned the designation not just thanks to its halal restaurants, but also for its hotels with Muslim-friendly amenities.

In the closet there are two prayer mats for guests to use. Inside the drawer there’s also a qibla indicator showing which direction to pray. Every restroom also comes equipped with a bidet.

Ni Shao-hua
Muslim-friendly hotel manager
We think there’s huge market potential for Muslim travelers. It’s also keeping with government policy and some business exchanges. We’re honored to be recognized as both a Muslim-friendly hotel and restaurant.

Voice of Yuan Kai-chih
Tourism Administration international division deputy head
Taiwan already has over 400 restaurants and hotels that have been verified as Muslim-friendly. Most of our Muslim travelers come from Malaysia and Indonesia.

Without travelers from China, other markets like Japan, Korea, Europe, America, and Southeast Asia — including Muslim markets — are key to diversifying tourism.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-18

Far Eastern chair weighs in on minimum wage at shareholders’ meeting

Far Eastern Department Stores came out with stellar results at its shareholders’ meeting on Tuesday. The company achieved earnings per share of NT$1.95 last year, and will issue a cash dividend of NT$1.6 per share. Top executives addressed issues including AI, the labor shortage, and upcoming consultations expected to raise the minimum wage by at least 3.8%.

Far Eastern Department Stores held its annual shareholders’ meeting on Tuesday. Far Eastern Group Chair Douglas Hsu and his sister Nancy Hsu took questions, addressing the labor shortage and next week’s deliberations over the minimum wage. Douglas Hsu gave his perspective.

Douglas Hsu
Far Eastern Group chair
Labor shortages are a global trend. The question is how we make up the shortfall. From where I’m standing, I can offer something nice. The higher the wage, the better. But you have to be able to afford it. The most important thing is productivity. The real question is, can your production levels support your wage levels?

Shaking off the pandemic, Far Eastern Department Stores posted earnings per share of NT$1.95 last year, and will issue a cash dividend of NT$1.6 per share. Amid the AI boom, the firm announced plans to adopt the latest technology to enhance everyday experiences.

Douglas Hsu
Far Eastern Group chair
AI is incredibly challenging, to tell the truth. It will take a great deal of effort to do AI.

Taiwan’s AI industry is at the vanguard of the world. With TSMC building plants in Tainan, Kaohsiung, and Chiayi, Far Eastern Department Stores was asked about its own potential expansion.

Nancy Hsu
Far Eastern Department Stores president
Actually we already have stores in all three of those locations, but they’re not large. Perhaps after TSMC completes its projects, and the labor market and overall market improves in the south, we will expand our presence there.

Having planted its flag at Taipei Dome, Far Eastern Group is taking aim at NT$50 billion in revenue, to challenge Shin Kong Mitsukoshi for market dominance.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-18

Spotlight on MA-tek: a leading supplier of semiconductor materials testing

Everyone is talking about Taiwan’s AI and tech industry after recent big announcements from Nvidia’s Jensen Huang. In a much-publicized talk, the Nvidia CEO namedropped lots of the Taiwanese companies that are important partners in the silicon supply chain. But one important firm that he left out was MA-tek. The firm is a leading supplier of semiconductor materials testing. It supports the world’s biggest brands to analyze and check the quality of their products. FTV spoke to the firm’s founder Hsieh Yung-fen to find out more about the role testing plays in Taiwan’s tech ecology.

In a recent talk, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang highlighted 43 Taiwanese companies on a map of Taiwan – important partners in Taiwan’s tech supply chain. But no quick report could really cover all of the partners of Nvidia. One of them is MA-tek, the biggest provider of semiconductor materials testing and analysis.

Hsieh Yung-fen
MA-tek chair
It would take more than one day to describe Taiwan’s potential. There was a time when, in tech marketing, you would only talk about how great you are. You wouldn’t talk up all your suppliers. Now Jensen Huang has included all his suppliers, which makes it more apparent how technology can be a driver of the whole of society, and make Taiwanese people more confident. He’s really done some good advertising for Taiwan, including with the zongzi, dumplings and the night markets he’s visited. He’s made Taiwan look so warm and friendly; it’s a light and easy way for people from around the world to learn about Taiwan. I think he takes tech marketing, this thing that’s so high-end and so hard to understand, and he makes it bite-size. That’s really quite a skill.

Hsieh Yung-fen founded MA-tek at the age of 43 to provide testing and analysis to the world’s big semiconductor manufacturers. Her clients include TSMC, Nvidia, Intel, AMD, Microsoft, and Meta and the firm has labs over 15 regions in the world.

Chai Huan-hsin
Industry analyst
The whole AI trend is still just on the up and up. Future opportunities will see growth of 100% and higher. The testing industry will play an extremely key role in profits.

Hsieh Yung-fen
MA-tek chair
Several of the big players had come up, and I felt a bit embarrassed to say, “Well actually, all of those companies are our clients at MA-tek. And there’s another three firms behind them which you haven’t mentioned, which I think will come up soon…”

As AI changes the world, testing firms will soon be seeing a fresh wave of opportunities as part of Taiwan’s booming tech industry.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-18

Table tennis academy teaches more than the sport

Today we take you to meet a former national team athlete who founded a table tennis academy. The academy not only teaches the sport, but also trains the brain and enhances life skills. FTV reporter Stephany Yang spoke to the founder to learn more.

Through a series of executive function tests, students are evaluated on their inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, and working memory.

The tests are fun games and participants can receive their results within 20 minutes. This is not a psychology experiment. It’s part of a table tennis academy program in Taipei.

Hung Tsung-min
Founder
I created it because I run these kinds of studies for more than 20 years. For my study, it is so evident to show that sports training that incorporates cognitive function components into the training is very effective for all kinds of individuals especially for those who are kind of weak in their attention skills. For example, children who are attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We have a lot of evidence to show that it is effective.

The table tennis program incorporates all three components assessed in the game. Participants will be able to learn skills, train their physical fitness, and improve their cognitive function. They will also take a test again to see their progress.

Wang I-tse
Coach
The inhibition function is a bit like when we are doing up-and-down rotation exercises because it requires controlling, waiting, and predicting. The working memory part is more like when we are running, we may need to hit a few forehands and backhands, and we need to know where to hit the ball. In the test, we have a few children whose original concentration may only be at 70% to 80%, but after the class, they improved to 100%. At this table tennis academy, we not only provide table tennis training, but we also have a comprehensive training model that ranges from brain training to life education.

The founder of this academy is Taiwanese sports professor Dr. Hung Tsung-min. He is a professor and researcher at National Taiwan Normal University. Before he started teaching, he was a national table tennis star. He was elected an international fellow of the U.S.’ National Academy of Kinesiology. The prestigious title is regarded as the Nobel Prize of the sports world. At his table tennis academy, he has implemented his long-term research results in sports cognitive neuroscience. Through customized exercise and professional training methods, he hopes to help improve the brain cognitive functions of all ages.

Hung Tsung-min
Founder
Nowadays we are facing the serious challenge of having a very low birth rate for the young children. So we need to provide some kind of training for these young kids to be able to develop their mental skills so they can be more productive for their future. For the elderly, because we are also entering a super-aging society so we need to find ways to try to maintain their cognitive function so that they can still be productive during their later lives.

Hung says racket sports have positive effects on executive functions and all aspects of the body and mind. Not only does it help improve cardiopulmonary function, coordination, and muscle strength, but it also improves executive function skills. The academy is comprised of several national players who serve as coaches. In addition to being able to play well, coaches also have to go through rigorous training to learn theory.

Hung Tsung-min
Founder
I have to find good coaches because these coaches have to not only be good in table tennis but also they have to be good at learning all the theories and all the knowledge behind the training for improving executive function. That is the most important and most difficult part. All the coaches have gone through training for three months.

Chuang Ying-i
CEO
Our courses include brainstorming courses, which are relatively rare in traditional table tennis academies. I am 68 years old. I come here at least three days a week. The school has greatly benefited my whole body and mind.

The academy hopes to not only improve their students’ table tennis game but also to enhance their executive functions so that they can lead healthy lives.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-18

Restaurants preparing as Taiwan reaches bluefin tuna quota early

Fishers and restauranteurs have been disturbed by a curveball to the fishing industry. The upper limit of bluefin fishing has been reached early, which means Taiwan is now forbidden from catching any more bluefin tuna for the year. It could cause problems for the supply of tuna later in the year. The fish is very popular with high-end chefs for dishes like sushi. But some restaurants are sanguine about the quota being reached, and have their own plans to handle the situation.

Many foodies love bluefin tuna sashimi for its tender flesh and even marbling. But this year the catch in Taiwan has maxxed out its international quota early. Are customers worried that bluefin will soon be off the menu?

Member of public
I think we can take the chance to try some other fish.

Member of public
Bluefin tuna isn’t necessarily the only choice. There are actually lots of different types of great sashimi.

Reaching the bluefin quota early means that fishers can’t keep going out to catch more. The bluefin that has already been caught will have to suffice for the whole of the rest of the year.

A restaurant owner takes us out back into his walk-in freezer, at minus 70 degrees Celsius. Here’s the massive store of bluefin tuna.

Hsiao Yu-tse
Restaurant owner
It’s beautiful, look at this color. So you can keep this tuna in the freezer for a year.

If tuna is kept at an inadequate temperature, it quickly oxidizes, which affects its texture and juiciness. So the restaurant keeps it fresh in this deep freezer.

Hsiao Yu-tse
Restaurant owner
We get it to minus 70 to freeze the bluefin tuna. We can store 40 heads of tuna or 10 tons. That can supply our customers for a year.

This company has a foolproof plan to handle the limited supply of bluefin, so they can make just two or three months of fishing last for a whole year.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-18

Lai urges cadets not to give in to defeatism

Amid continued PLA provocations, President Lai Ching-te is urging cadets not to give in to defeatism. Speaking at the R.O.C. Military Academy’s centennial celebration, the president said that today’s cadets must acknowledge the challenges of “the new era,” in particular the rise of China. He referenced a phrase used by former President Ma Ying-jeou in 2020, calling it defeatist and absolutely unacceptable.

Last Friday afternoon, a Chinese electronic reconnaissance ship appeared roughly 36 nautical miles southeast of Wushibi, Yilan. Taiwan’s Navy and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force immediately initiated surveillance.

Just one day later, the CCP’s Chengdu and Nanyang vessels were sighted in the same area, and were monitored closely by Taiwan’s Navy. Amid continued harassment from China, President Lai Ching-te had forceful words in his speech at the R.O.C. Military Academy’s centennial celebration on Sunday. He said that Taiwan cannot accept the “first battle is the last battle” theory, calling it defeatist. He was referring to a 2020 interview with former President Ma Ying-jeou, in which Ma said China intends to take over Taiwan in one swift operation. Lai’s remarks were decried by Ma’s office.

Wellington Koo
Defense minister
What Lai meant is that we cannot accept defeatism. He said that we can’t accept the theory of “the first battle is the last battle,” that our goal is to continue to strengthen our defense capabilities and to demonstrate our resolve. We must create a strategy based on actions the enemy might take. We must develop a defense that weakens the enemy’s ability to attack Taiwan.

Defense chief Wellington Koo pushed back against Ma’s office, saying Lai meant to emphasize the need for asymmetrical warfare and a layered deterrence strategy to thwart the enemy. But according to Ma’s office, the DPP’s Tsai administration had acknowledged the “first battle is the last battle” notion in a defense report, citing it as the PLA’s strategic goal.

Wellington Koo
Defense minister
The CCP wants the first battle to be the last battle. It’s wishful thinking. This goal contrasts sharply with our own goal, which is that we will not yield an inch of territory.

Hsu Chiao-hsin
KMT lawmaker
He says the so-called defeatism of the “first battle is the last battle” theory is unacceptable. Who are these people embracing defeatism? Can you name some for me? Who holds such views? I want to join President Lai in scolding them.

Wellington Koo
Defense minister
I can’t speak for President Lai.

Responding to the opposition’s challenge, Koo remained composed, allowing Lai’s words to speak for themselves.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
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2024-06-17

Fundraiser underway for US Air Force Academy alumnus Hsu Hao-ming

A fundraising campaign is underway for Hsu Hao-ming, a Taiwanese airman who graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy on a scholarship. Hsu, his mother, and grandmother got in a car crash in the U.S. last month, just before Hsu’s graduation ceremony. A nonprofit organization and seven corporations are working together to raise NT$10 million, with nearly NT$8 million already collected. The defense ministry is also coordinating with U.S. authorities to arrange the family’s medical evacuation back to Taiwan.

A choir belts out military songs at a fundraiser for U.S. Air Force Academy alumnus Hsu Hao-ming and his family. Late last month, they got in a serious car accident in the U.S. state of Colorado, shortly before Hsu’s graduation ceremony. The family, which was struggling financially, now faces enormous medical fees.

Wang I-lang
Taiwan Good Association head
Our goal is to raise at least NT$10 million, and we’re nearly at NT$8 million. The money will go to Hsu’s family to provide peace of mind, so that they can focus on recovery.

Pan Men-an
Presidential Office secretary-general
The very day he received the news, President Lai ordered our friends in the private sector and various welfare groups to launch support initiatives. The president’s close friend, Director Wang, rallied others to ease the financial strain on Hsu Hao-ming’s family.

To ensure optimal care for Hsu’s mother and grandmother, Taiwan’s defense ministry is working with their U.S. hospital to plan a medical evacuation back to Taiwan.

Wu Ming-yen
Taiwan Nongovernmental Hospitals and Clinics Association director
We’ve asked Taiwan’s best emergency medicine group to send nurses or doctors to join them on the trip back, to ensure their safety.

Wang I-lang
Taiwan Good Association head
We’ve asked a lawyer to negotiate with the hospital on cost, because the fees are truly too expensive. We’ve also inquired with China Airlines. The most economical route is for them to take China Airlines to Los Angeles for a pickup.

As Taiwanese rally to support a compatriot in need, the defense ministry is taking the lead to support a military family.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
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2024-06-17

Consumers’ Foundation to file class action for food poisoning victims

The Consumers’ Foundation has announced a class action suit against the Polam Kopitiam restaurant in Taipei’s Xinyi District. The lawsuit is on behalf of the six people who died and 24 others injured from food poisoning, after eating at the restaurant in March. At the foundation’s news conference on Monday, the first victim with serious injuries to be discharged spoke via video. She said she’s still wary of dining out and will not eat flat rice noodles again. Even though she’s recovered, she said she’s still feeling the effects and decided to come forward to protect her rights.

Huang Shu-chun
Food poisoning victim
When I was in the ICU, I just wanted to survive. After getting out, my energy has been so low. I don’t dare to eat any Southeast Asian food or flat rice noodles.

Huang Shu-chun is a victim of the Polam Kopitiam food poisoning case that has killed six and injured 24. After recovering from a serious reaction, she decided to file a class action lawsuit against the restaurant through the Consumers’ Foundation.

Huang Shu-chun
Food poisoning victim
Polam Kopitiam absolutely has to bear responsibility. I think they should get a heavy sentence because they bear the weight of six lives.

Heavy concentrations of bongkrekic acid were found in the victims, but 19 food samples taken from the restaurant and its suppliers all tested negative for the respiratory toxin. Many questions remain about the case, including attribution of responsibility. All branches of the restaurant have closed down, meaning there might also be no way to seek compensation.

Joann Su
Consumers’ Foundation honorary chair
Assets held by the restaurant might not be able to cover the victims’ damages. Under the Consumer Protection Act, business owners must bear joint and several liability. If our investigation finds no one at fault, then the department store has insurance.

Wu Jung-ta
Consumers’ Foundation chair
The Supreme Court’s view is that psychological compensation can be claimed as punitive damages. It’s possible that damages could exceed NT$100 million.

According to the foundation, if the victims are awarded the same psychological damages as those of the 2015 water park fire case, those with minor injuries could get NT$5 million, while those with serious injuries could get NT$10 million. The families of the deceased could be awarded NT$50 million. Altogether, the claims are expected to exceed NT$100 million. The foundation will also seek punitive damages if the restaurant is found at fault. Regardless, it said it will simultaneously seek damages from the department store to protect the rights of the victims.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-17

Taiwanese films win at Cannes Film Festival

Taiwanese films and immersive works won several awards at this year’s 77th Cannes Film Festival. The Ministry of Culture and the Taiwan Creative Content Agency held a press conference to congratulate the award-winning and shortlisted teams. FTV reporter Stephany Yang has the details.

The 77th Cannes Film Festival has just concluded. Several Taiwanese films and immersive works were shortlisted and a few even won awards.

Among them is the AR work "Colored,” a collaboration between Taiwan and France. The film takes audiences back to 1955 and into America’s segregated society. Viewers witness 15-year-old teenager Claudette Colvin’s fight against the system and how she helped launch the civil rights movement. The AR work was shot in Taiwan using the 4DViews technique. It won Best Immersive Work at the Cannes Film Festival.

Chen Chia-yu
Administrative coordinator
This work brought together people from over 20 countries to participate in this production. In addition to France and Taiwan, all our actors live and study in Taiwan: American, Ugandan, British, or Russian, among others. This work can be considered an international production.

“Mongrel” depicts the life of an undocumented Thai caregiver in Taiwan. The film explores themes of immigration, labor exploitation, and resilience.

Lynn Chen
Producer
This film is about the communication between the caregiver and the person being cared for, and the presence of the bridge between them.

To support creators, the Ministry of Culture and the Taiwan Creative Content Agency launched a series of subsidies and awards for creators as part of an effort to help Taiwanese artists shine on the international stage.

Homme Tsai
Taiwan Creative Content Agency chair
In addition to the Taiwanese team’s seven shortlisted and award-winning works at the 77th Cannes Film Festival this year, in the future, the Taiwan Creative Content Agency will send more Taiwanese filmmakers to well-known international film festivals. Whether it’s directors or some stars, by having them go abroad we can show the world our outstanding teams from Taiwan.

Li Yuan
Culture minister
Based on our situation this year, our grants and funds have increased to a maximum of NT$50 million. Add that to money invested into Taiwanese filmmakers by the Taiwan Creative Content Agency, I think that, even for a new talent, our filmmakers are very lucky compared to those in other countries.

The Ministry of Culture and the Taiwan Creative Content Agency held a press conference to congratulate the winners, and also express their hope to foster more talent and create more opportunities for international co-productions.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-06-17

Taiwan-Poland trade grows as Poland offers subsidies

TSMC’s factory in Germany is expected to start construction at the end of 2024. Close by, Czechia and Poland are also targeting the vast business opportunities afforded by semiconductors. They’re reaching out to Taiwanese companies, incentivizing them with flexible subsidies and the hardworking spirit of their workforce. Poland recovered quickly after World War II and has frequently exchanged with Taiwan over the last three years. Now it is expanding Taiwan-Poland trade, which already exceeds NT$320 billion annually.

Looking at Warsaw today, it’s hard to imagine that the Polish capital was almost destroyed during World War II. More than 90 percent of churches, castles, and monuments have since been rebuilt. But the economy here has been growing rapidly for the past five years.

Ryan
Taiwanese immigrant
When I came here five years ago the pandemic was just starting. But in the last few years suddenly a lot of new things have come up.

The local light rail has a history of over 100 years and intersects with bus routes, offering public transportation to Warsaw’s 1.76 million people. Since the outbreak of the Russia-Ukraine war, 3.31 million Ukrainian refugees have fled to Poland. The government issues work permits to refugees, making the labor force a factor in attracting Taiwanese businesses.

Lukasz Piotr Lanksi
Polish Investment and Trade Agency Taipei office
Poland is actually ranked first among countries offering work permits. Within the EU, most come from Ukraine and Belarus, but some employees also come from the Philippines and India. So, we aren’t very worried about our workforce like other countries.

With TSMC’s factory in Germany starting construction at the end of 2024, Poland has a geographical advantage.

Looking at the map of Taiwanese investment in Poland, USI, an ASE company, bought a packaging factory in Warsaw in 2018. In 2023 it built a second packaging factory in Wroclaw. MediaTek also opened a research center in Warsaw. Poland continues to offer incentives to Taiwanese businesses.

Lukasz Piotr Lanksi
Polish Investment and Trade Agency Taipei office
Polish people work hard. We also offer the highest subsidies of any country in the EU.

Poland wants to be noticed by Taiwanese businesses and hopes for direct flights from Taoyuan to Warsaw. With Taiwan-Poland trade exceeding NT$320 billion annually, the world is waiting to see if Poland will become a new frontier for semiconductor manufacturing.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53


2024-06-17

New exhibition of paintings by Lin Kui-hua opens at Tainan Art Museum

A new exhibition of paintings by Lin Kui-hua is on show at Tainan Art Museum. The “Shared Vision” show features closely observed paintings of social interactions, and examines the impact of technology on daily life. Lin was formerly a business entrepreneur, and has turned to painting full-time in later life. Her delicate style is full of wry commentary on society as well as humans’ connection to the land.

Lin Kui-hua’s paintings depict the huge changes wrought on everyone’s lives by the advent of consumer technology, and the new face of contemporary society.

Lin Kui-hua
Artist
This is our era. Sometimes we paint in order to leave a record of the era.

This painting, “Hide and Seek,” depicts a child hiding in a closet, who eavesdrops on the goings on in the wider world. But his bare feet are poking out into view, proving his existence. This painting is in the collection of a Japanese business owner, and was lent specially to the exhibition so it could be made available to the wider public.

Lin Kui-hua
Artist
We often say that people need to maintain a “beginner’s mind.” I think I regain that kind of feeling from these children.

Lin was formerly a junior high school teacher and pursued further studies in the U.S., then working in the import-export business. She and her husband founded an electronics company in the U.S. But in her leisure time, she never lost her love for painting. She studied painting in America and returned to Taiwan to take up painting full-time more than a decade ago.

Lin Kui-hua
Artist
I didn’t want to be an amateur painter, because only by getting into the professional workplace could I come into contact with professionals, and learn the real conditions that should be met. So this is how I’ve spent the last decade or more.

Li Chung-liang
Husband of Lin Kui-hua
Every day, she says to me, “As a painter you can’t just paint the same thing over and over again.” So she’s constantly finding something new to do, just like when we were in business.

The works in this exhibition use fine brushwork and innovative framing to explore fine observations of society and social dynamics.

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2024-06-17