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New legislature inaugurates its caucus for promoting closer ties with US Congress

The newly-elected Legislative Yuan on Friday inaugurated its Legislative Yuan USA Caucus that promotes friendship between Taiwanese lawmakers and American members of Congress. In attendance was U.S. deputy ambassador Jeremy Cornforth, Legislative Speaker Han Kuo-yu and vice president-elect Hsiao Bi-khim. The political significance doesn’t just stop with a further warming of Taiwan-U.S. ties. It’s also a sign that compared with past legislatures, there’s a new atmosphere of cross-party cooperation. The caucus is jointly headed by DPP lawmaker Wang Ting-yu and KMT lawmaker Ko Chih-en and a total of 73 legislators from across the political spectrum are taking part.

The newly-elected Legislative Yuan on Friday inaugurated its Legislative Yuan USA Caucus. Not only was KMT legislative speaker Han Kuo-yu and his deputy Johnny Chiang present, but also American Institute in Taiwan Deputy Director Jeremy Cornforth and vice president-elect Hsiao Bi-khim. This was the first time Hsiao entered her old stomping grounds, the Legislative Yuan, since being elected vice president.

Hsiao Bi-khim
Vice president-elect
The hat I’m wearing today should not be that of vice-president elect. I come today as a graduate of the 9th Legislative Yuan. That’s one of my hats. My second hat is head of the Legislative Yuan USA Caucus for the 9th Legislative Yuan.

Han Kuo-yu
Legislative speaker
We’ve got 113 legislators, and 73 are taking part in the Legislative Yuan USA Caucus. This number is really extremely surprising. Each one of you will meet many members of U.S. Congress in the future and you must welcome them to the Legislative Yuan for a meal. Dining out with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is colorless, while dining out with the Legislative Yuan is colorful.

Tien Chung-kwang
Deputy foreign minister
I will definitely share this with my colleagues when I return, but I must report to caucus members that Ministry of Foreign Affairs banquets are splendid and meaningful affairs.

It is the first time for the caucus, which is in its 11th iteration, to have two heads: the DPP’s Wang Ting-yu and KMT’s Ko Chih-en. Reports had said that Chiang had originally planned to form the caucus with his party. However, Wang also had the same plans and was set to form the group before him on Thursday. To avoid conflict, the two parties’ caucus conveners met for negotiations and decided on the current arrangement.

Wang Ting-yu
DPP legislator
Actually, I invited Ko Chih-en to serve as deputy chair at the very beginning. There was definitely a negotiating process. It’s not about who is fighting for dominance. All sides, each political party, hopes to care about and work for Taiwan-U.S. relations. We must organize and integrate as one, and everyone can work together.

Ko Chih-en
KMT legislator
According to my understanding, the largest party in the legislature should take on the role of chair. Because it’s like this, each and every one of us feel that they should make even greater contributions to Taiwan-U.S. relations. So we can say we’ve set a precedent. The AIT also hopes to have a counterpart unit.

In a break from the past, there’s a new atmosphere of cross-party cooperation, starting with the just-formed Legislative Yuan USA Caucus.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

Time:2024-02-23

最新消息 Latest News

President-elect Lai Ching-te hopes that orchids can be Taiwanese money-spinners

President-elect Lai Ching-te on Friday attended the opening ceremonies of the 23rd World Orchid Conference and the 20th Taiwan International Orchid Show. After seeing the show, Lai was full of praise for Taiwan’s orchids, saying he hoped they could be sold globally in the way the Netherlands sells tulips. This would give farmers more business and boost the economy.

Cutting a birthday cake with the number “20” kicks off the 20th Taiwan International Orchid Show. President-elect Lai Ching-te was in attendance and in his opening speech he emphasized he hoped Taiwan’s orchids could be just like Dutch tulips, providing income for even more people and creating an even greater economic output value.

Lai Ching-te
Vice president
I hope that Tainan’s orchids can be the same as tulips in the Netherlands, providing for even more Taiwanese people, and becoming an identification symbol of Taiwan internationally.

In addition to the Taiwan International Orchid Show in the government-run Taiwan Orchid Technology Park, the World Orchid Conference will be held in Tainan’s International Convention Center. Tainan Mayor Huang Wei-che voiced hope that the orchid events and the Taiwan Lantern Festival would attract visitors to the city in its 400th anniversary.

Huang Wei-che
Tainan mayor
All these events happening together can make Tainan even better and more fun.

Owing to the joint showing of these two major orchid events, this year visitor numbers are expected to exceed 200,000.

Huang Wei-che
Tainan mayor
This year, Tainan turns 400, and our orchid show during the day, and Taiwan Lantern Festival at night, along with the Yuejin Lantern Festival, all complement each other, so I believe it is a reasonable estimate to see upward of 200,000 people this year.

The Orchid show, with the theme of “Orchid Together” covers Taiwanese orchids from many angles: conservation, history, culture, academic research and daily life applications. Together with the lantern shows, Tainan is a must-visit for flower lovers.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-23

New Delhi’s deadly air pollution prompts some to quit city

Severe air pollution in India’s capital city, which has failed to improve despite efforts, is prompting a small but growing number of people to leave New Delhi to escape the health hazards posed by dirty air. Many are relocating to the western coastal city of Goa, which has witnessed an influx of so-called pollution migrants. VOA’s Anjana Pasricha has more.

Prashant Kalra relocated from Delhi to the western coastal city Goa five years ago because the city’s dirty air was making his then three-year-old daughter sick.

Prashant Kalra
Entrepeneur
Our daughter could not breathe in Delhi NCR… because she needed a nebulizer every night just to go to sleep.

NCR refers to Delhi and surrounding districts. Kalra is among a small but growing number of people quitting that urban sprawl as two-decade long efforts fail to clean up the toxic smog that shrouds it every winter.

Most are heading to Goa, a popular holiday destination that has become a magnet for so-called “pollution migrants” from Delhi.

For this couple, the trigger for moving two years ago was their daughter’s persistent cough.

Salil Pawah
Entrepeneur
She got put on an inhaler and also the nebulizer. That is when I realized it is the air.

Delhi’s pollution is caused by a mix of construction dust, vehicular emissions and burning of crop residue. Doctors say every winter brings a steady stream of patients affected by the air quality.

Dr. Suranjit Chatterjee
Indraprastha Apollo Hospital
Exposure longtime to high pollutants obviously affects everybody’s health.

The numbers leaving Delhi have accelerated since the COVID-19 pandemic, which gave the flexibility to work from different locations.

Salil Pawah
Entrepeneur
When I moved to Goa, I did not know anybody else. Now in a span of two years, I know probably 20 people who moved here for the same reason.

Moving out of Delhi is a choice available only to a few. But the trend underscores that cleaning up India’s mega cities will be one of the country’s biggest challenges as the government sets an ambitious goal of making India a developed nation by 2047.

Anjana Pasricha, VOA News, New Delhi

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
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2024-02-23

Van Gogh, Rembrandt and Raphael works to star in Chimei Museum exhibition

Chimei Museum in Tainan will play host to a blockbuster art exhibition in May. The “Masterpieces from the National Gallery, London” exhibition will bring 52 masterpieces of Western art to Taiwan. The National Gallery is the U.K.’s most prestigious art museum, and has an encyclopaedic collection of important Western paintings. This show will share original works by Van Gogh, Rembrandt and Raphael with Taiwanese audiences. Early bird tickets go on sale on March 1.

The huge news has rocked the art world, once again establishing Chimei Museum as a hot topic for fans of Western art.

Cheng Po-hui
FTV reporter
It’s being called the biggest exhibition of Western art in Taiwan. From Raphael to Van Gogh, “Masterpieces from the National Gallery, London” is coming to Chimei Museum. The show only opens on May 2, but the countdown has already begun for many art lovers.

Tsai Hai-kuang
Exhibition team representative
They’re all some of the most famous artists in history, and they’re all original works. So there are 50 artists in total and 52 works of art.

Unlike past exhibitions which have focused on a single great master, “Masterpieces from the National Gallery” will lead visitors on a journey from the Renaissance all the way to the Impressionists, laying out the essential developments of Western art over more than 400 years.

Tsai Hai-kuang
Exhibition team representative
The exhibition will cover 400 years, from the Renaissance all the way to the Impressionists in the 19th century. So visitors will be able to see an overview of Western painting across 400 years.

High Renaissance artist Raphael. Rembrandt, the Dutch “master of light.” Impressionist superstar Van Gogh. Fifty-two masterpieces will go on show at Chimei, which has been chosen by the National Gallery as its sole partner museum in Taiwan. It’s also the last stop in the exhibition’s tour of Asia.

Chung Chia-hsin
Chimei Museum PR manager
After they are shown here in Taiwan, all the work will return to the National Gallery, because it needs to go back there for the gallery’s bicentenary.

A limited number of early bird tickets will go on sale on March 1, but there’s already huge buzz around the exhibition. Art lovers can’t wait to get to Tainan.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-23

TSMC executives land in Japan ahead of Kumamoto fab inauguration

TSMC Chair Mark Liu and CEO C. C. Wei have landed in Japan ahead of the inauguration of the chipmaker’s plant in Kumamoto. The ceremony is set to take place on Saturday afternoon, and be attended by VIPs including Japan Prime Minister Kishida Fumio and Japan Minister of Economy Ken Saito. Let’s hear from some local officials.

Miwa Takayuki
Kumamoto commerce and industry official
TSMC’s fab is a huge investment in Kumamoto and in Japan. It’s something unprecedented in history.

Onishi Kazufumi
Kumamoto mayor
The second plant is expected to have an economic effect of 10 trillion yen. The annual GDP of Kumamoto will hit 2.4 trillion yen.

Yang Szu-min
FTV reporter
TSMC’s fab in Kumamoto is set to hold its inauguration ceremony on Saturday morning. TSMC has captured front-page headlines in local newspapers, saying its second fab in the prefecture could be granted up to 730 billion yen in subsidies.

The first fab is set to start producing chips at the 12, 16 and 28 nanometer-scale this year. Earlier this month, TSMC announced construction on its second fab is expected to start by the end of the year. The second plant is expected to introduce more advanced processes. The first fab has a subsidy of 436 billion yen, and the second plant, 730 billion yen. The Japanese government is fully backing the projects, to boost industry growth, as well as tourism and consumption.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-23

Two days of explosive fun kick off at Yanshui Beehive Fireworks Festival

One of Taiwan’s biggest celebrations for the Lantern Festival is the Yanshui Beehive Fireworks Festival in Tainan. This year, 400 pavilions loaded with fireworks will be lit up during the multi-day pyrotechnic extravaganza. A local temple leader says more than 200,000 people are expected to visit Yanshui for the festival.

Tainan Mayor Huang Wei-che, lawmakers and councilors assume their positions to inaugurate the Yanshui Beehive Fireworks Festival with a bang.

The strings of firecrackers reach up to a gate suspended in the sky, symbolizing success. And with that, the two-day festival kicks off, starting with a parade.

Huang Wei-che
Tainan mayor
The Yanshui Beehive Fireworks Festival will have 400 firework pavilions, to celebrate 400 years since the founding of Tainan. Every pavilion has undergone safety inspections. They have to pass the certification before they get set alight.

A parade with gods in sedan chairs streams out from the temple, as fireworks go off at every pavilion it passes by.

Many thrill seekers took part in the event in the morning. Readied with helmets, coats, jeans and thick cloths, they stepped into the explosive extravaganza.

Participant
I come every year, because my grandma is from Yanshui.

Wong Tsai-chin
Yanshui Wumiao
We’ll be setting off fireworks from Saturday evening all the way to about 4 or 5 a.m. on Sunday. I think that, combined with the Yuejin Lantern Festival, at least 200,000 people will visit Yanshui for the Beehive Fireworks Festival

This year, the parades will run along five routes, and revelers can scan the QR codes provided to see where the procession is located at any time. The main event will take place on Saturday night at the sports field at Yanshui Junior High School. There, four firework pavilions will be set off at the same time, for a pyrotechnic show to never forget.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-23

Close-up footage of a Formosan black bear eating its lunch by a river

Now, for fans of Taiwan’s wild landscapes: employees of the Forestry and Nature Conservation Agency in Chiayi are celebrating. They caught close-up footage of a Formosan black bear eating its lunch by a river. The footage is the best of its kind for the Chiayi Branch office. It’s the result of a new project placing infrared cameras across Chiayi and Tainan. Other cameras have caught exciting glimpses of many wild animals, like bears, deer, and martens.

A Formosan black bear stands on some boulders by the side of this river, guzzling on a fresh catch. When it’s full, it bounds nimbly away across the water.

The footage was taken at Nanzihsian River by an employee of the Chiayi Branch of the Forestry and Nature Conservation Agency. Colleagues are still cooing over it.

Hsu Yu-ching
Forestry and Nature Conservation Agency, Chiayi Branch
We’ve never had such close-up footage before. Normally, we just see traces of the bears, or excrement, nothing so close-up, or eating food like this. Black bears are extremely wary of humans.

The branch has installed automatic infrared cameras in the mountains of Chiayi and Tainan, to monitor the movements of wild animal populations and collect footage. They’ve captured: wild boar hunting for food, two small bears, yellow-throated martens gathering to drink from a pond, a sambar deer wallowing in mud, and a curious Reeve’s muntjac staring into the lens.

Lee Ting-chung
Forestry and Nature Conservation Agency, Chiayi Branch
We’ve recorded some very diverse footage of animals, and even very cute images. This allows us to understand trends in the dispersal of animal populations, and draw up our conservation strategies.

These precious images also reveal the successes of past conservation projects. But experts are keen to stress that if you visit the mountains and happen to come upon a similar scene, never give a bear cause for alarm.

Hsu Yu-ching
Forestry and Nature Conservation Agency, Chiayi Branch
If you meet a black bear in the wild, you must stay calm. Don’t raise your voice. Keep facing the bear, and slowly back away, out of its line of sight. And then escape from the area.

The agency also notes that if you come across a wild animal, don’t touch it, don’t disturb it, and don’t feed it: “three don’ts.” But do make sure you take away any food you take into the wild, to avoid causing any damage to the mountain ecosystems.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-23

Cold Lantern Festival weekend for northern and central Taiwan

The Lantern Festival weekend is set to be a cold one in many areas of Taiwan. Lows in central and northern Taiwan could dip to a chilly 13 degrees on Saturday and Sunday. The cold is not expected to ease up until next Wednesday.

Workers shake a tray with glutinous rice flour to wrap up balls of fillings. People stand in line to buy a serving of these round Lantern Festival treats.

Member of public
I’ve been in line for about half an hour. I like the jujube paste and the mung bean ones.

The Lantern Festival is on Saturday, and it’s set to be a cold one in the north, as northwesterly winds blow in. On Friday, daily lows hit 11.2 degrees in New Taipei’s Fugui Cape and Shimen District, and 14.3 degrees in Taipei.

Lo Ya-yin
Central Weather Administration
On Saturday and Sunday, lows in central and northern Taiwan will linger at around 13 or 14 degrees. In other areas they’ll remain at about 16 to 18 degrees. On the night from the 25 to the 26, more cold air will sweep in, bringing temperatures down. They’ll be especially low in central and northern Taiwan. So lows could dip to between 11 and 14 degrees on the 26 and the days before and after.

The weekend could get chilly. Lows in the north could be 1 to 2 degrees lower than now. Over in central and southern Taiwan, warm weather is expected during the daytime, but with big temperature swings to lower temps at night. Precipitation is also in the forecast for the weekend, as weather in central and northern Taiwan turns cold and wet.

Lo Ya-yin
Central Weather Administration
Today and over the weekend, the rainy areas are Keelung and the north coast, the east coast and the greater Taipei area. These places may see brief localized showers. By Monday and Tuesday, the wet weather will intensify and spread to other areas in the north, as well as mountainous areas in central and southern Taiwan, which may see scattered showers. The wet conditions will taper off from Wednesday.

Northeasterly winds are picking up strength, bringing big waves to coastal areas and outlying islands. The cold will linger until Wednesday, so remember to wrap up warm if you’re heading out.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-23

Delegation led by House Select Committee on CCP chair lands in Taiwan

A congressional delegation from the U.S. has arrived in Taiwan. The group is led by Mike Gallagher, the chair of the House Select Committee on the Chinese Communist Party. The representatives on Thursday sat with President Tsai Ing-wen and Vice President Lai Ching-te. During the meetings, Gallagher said the visit represented the U.S.’ bipartisan support for Taiwan. He also thanked Tsai for her strong leadership, adding that Taiwan-U.S. relations were rock-solid.

President Tsai Ing-wen greets her guests like old friends. They are the members of a U.S. congressional delegation visiting Taiwan.

The delegation is led by U.S. Representative Mike Gallagher, who chairs the House Select Committee on the Chinese Communist Party. With him are committee ranking member Raja Krishnamoorthi from the Democratic Party, John Moolenaar of the Republican Party, Seth Moulton of the Democratic Party and Dusty Johnson of the Republican Party.

Tsai Ing-wen
President
Today you are leading a bipartisan congressional delegation to Taiwan demonstrating staunch U.S. support for Taiwan’s democracy through concrete action. Your visit further highlights the close partnership between Taiwan and the U.S. I would like to thank the U.S. administration and congress for continuing to assist Taiwan in strengthening its self-defense capabilities through the National Defense Authorization Act and other channels. Together we are safeguarding freedom and democracy and maintaining regional peace.

Mike Gallagher
House Select Committee on CCP
How rare it is, at least in our system, for a party to win the presidency, really, for three terms. And I think this unprecedented occurrence in Taiwan is a testament to your leadership, to your vision and the strength you demonstrated over the past eight years.

Besides regional security, President Tsai also seized the occasion to help Taiwan on its economic and trade goals.

Tsai Ing-wen
President
We also look forward to legislation on the Taiwan-U.S. double taxation issue, which was mentioned in the economic report by the select committee last year, being completed as soon as possible. This will create more profitable niches for businesses both in Taiwan and the U.S. and build a mutually beneficial trade and economic environment.

Mike Gallagher
House Select Committee on CCP
Today we’ve come as Democrats and Republicans to show our bipartisan support for this partnership, which, thanks to your leadership, I think, is stronger and more rock-solid than ever.

Gallagher is 39 years old and is currently serving his fourth term in the U.S. House of Representatives. In 2023, he became the chair of the House Select Committee on the Chinese Communist Party. He has a hawkish stance on China and previously introduced a report with 10 policy recommendations to preserve peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait. Gallagher has announced he won’t be running for election again, and on Thursday joked that perhaps Tsai would like to run to be his successor.

Mike Gallagher
House Select Committee on CCP
Since I know you’re going to leave office soon and I’m not running for reelection, if you want to try your hand at American politics, the people in northeast Wisconsin would welcome you if you throw your hand in our race. But you may be overqualified.

Lai Ching-te
Vice president
I would like to tell Chair Gallagher on a personal note that we still need you in the U.S. Congress so that you can continue to help us safeguard peace and democracy around the world. In the future, facing authoritarian expansionism and also different kinds of challenges, Vice President-elect Hsiao Bi-khim and I will work together when we are inaugurated on May 20. We will unite and work together with the people of Taiwan.

The delegation will stay in Taiwan for three days, until Feb. 24. Besides their meeting with President Tsai and Vice President Lai Ching-te, the group is scheduled to attend a banquet hosted by foreign minister Joseph Wu and meet with Legislative Speaker Han Kuo-yu.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-22

An exclusive look at TSMC’s factory in Kumamoto ahead of Feb. 24 inauguration

TSMC’s new fab in Japan’s Kumamoto prefecture is set to hold its inauguration ceremony this Saturday. Already, employees are working at the TSMC complex, which is located in the rural town of Kikuyo. Our correspondent in Japan takes us for a look at what a regular day looks like at the plant.

Yang Szu-min
FTV reporter
This is the nearest train station to TSMC’s plant. Every day before 7 a.m., shuttle busses pick up employees here and take them to the semiconductor park.

People stand in line waiting for the bus. TSMC’s fab in Kumamoto is located far afield, about 7 minutes away from the train station by car. That’s why employees who don’t drive must take a shuttle bus to work. The 14 shuttles depart between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m., taking workers from companies including TSMC, Sony and Tokyo Electron to the semiconductor park. Six of the shuttles stop right at the entrance to the TSMC fab.

TSMC employee
I’ve been here four months. It’s not bad at all, I settled in just fine. More and more foreigners are coming here.

TSMC employee
For like, four months I guess. Obviously, there’s the language barriers, but so far I think it’s fine.

Japanese and Taiwanese employees have already started working at the plant. TSMC’s fab in Kumamoto is located in the rural town of Kikuyo. After one year and eight months in construction, the chipmaker built its gigantic plant among crop fields.

The TSMC complex is composed of a white building, which is the fab itself, and a glass building. From the Japanese-style garden outside, you can see engineers in clean room suits moving through the building, and employees catching a break and eating a meal at the cafeteria. The building’s lobby is packed with flower arrangements ahead of the inauguration ceremony on Saturday. Japanese media outlet NHK has dispatched a team of 50 people to Kumamoto to cover the news, showing the fab’s importance for Japan.

Jack Kazuma Holcombe
NHK reporter
We’re covering about the semiconductor factory of TSMC, kind of a turning point for Japan related to semiconductor industry, so we are thinking it is a very important moment.

Yang Szu-min
FTV reporter
TSMC has expanded in Kumamoto, investing heavily to set up to fabs in the prefecture. The move has attracted attention nationwide and is expected to boost Japan’s semiconductor industry.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-22

Taipei art exhibition explores the dark side of AI

Is artificial intelligence reliable and of benefit to mankind? An exhibition in Taipei seeks to answer that question. On display are a series of works by 15 local and international artists that delve into the dark side of AI. However, they also showcase the positive aspects of this emerging technology. FTV reporter Stephany Yang met the curator to find out more about the exhibition.

This two-channel video installation is composed of characters, images, texts and background music. Each element is created by artificial intelligence.

One side of the installation showcases the positive aspects of AI, while the other side displays AI’s dark side.

This work is inspired by the Hollywood filmmakers’ union strike. It explores how AI interprets news about strikes and discusses issues involving the AI Bill of Rights, the relationship between humans and AI, work ethics and bias.

Keith Lam
Curator
This is by Daito Manabe, a Japanese artist. We have here two sides of projections. It is pretty much like the positive side of AI and the negative side. What you can see here is kind of like a movie. What you can see here from the images, from movements, from even the voice-over and even music are all generated by artificial intelligence. The starting point of making this work according to the artist is because of the occasion the strike of Hollywood. The strike is about whether artificial intelligence will replace human beings in the industry of movies.

One work titled "VS AI Street Fighting" explores the limitations and biases of AI. In the exhibition room are two gaming consoles that generate text-driven AI images. Visitors can respond to questions provided by AI-powered gadgets, and compete against AI-powered devices to produce images.

Escher Tsai
Curator
Regarding AI creation, we wanted people to compete with AI, so we designed this machine so that people and AI can create and compete together. What’s more special is during the exhibition period, the two AIs will answer questions generated by the system, and then they will continue to compete to produce images. We are very curious about what kind of interesting content and answers the AI can produce.

Another work "Unerasable Characters" by Hong Kong artist Winnie Soon, investigates the extent in which power inequality in digital infrastructure affects culture. The artist collected censored and removed textual data, before putting the censored versions and the deleted texts on display.

Keith Lam
Curator
According to what we know there is a lot of censorship in mainland China. What you type here some keywords will be censored or will be erased. The artist worked with researchers in the University of Hong Kong. There are Weibo scripts. This research project collected all the erased stories. What you can see in the exhibition is all the collected stories. But as we mentioned, they are all erased so we can’t see any keywords of the stories. Some keywords will be blanked or with some other characters. The artist used AI tools to pick up all the erased stories and at the same time, try to recompose the erased stories in another story.

AI has become a daily part of many people’s lives. The Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei is holding an exhibition to explore the dark sides of AI. The exhibition was co-curated by Keith Lam and Escher Tsai. A total of 15 local and foreign artists and groups are exhibiting their works at the exhibition. The exhibition seeks to explore the dark sides of AI and encourage visitors to reflect on their relationship with AI.

Keith Lam
Curator
We have the power with AI tools to make our lives better. At the same time, we could be a devil to do all kinds of surveillance. And all kinds of monitoring and even erasing the history, erase the human being histories. It is all about the options. What we have in advanced technology, what do you want it to be? To be a devil or an angel?

The exhibition will be on at the Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei till May.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-22

Persistence Pays Off for Long-time Coach Oliver Harley

Today we take you to meet Oliver Harley, a football coach from Jamaica who has coached football in Taiwan for 20 years. In 2023, his team of Taiwanese and expats won first place in Division Two and, therefore, earned promotion to the Taiwan Premier League for the 2024 season. FTV reporter Stephany Yang met the seasoned football coach to find out more about his career.

Hailing from Jamaica, Harley was once a football player who competed in the leagues of several countries. He moved to Taiwan in 1999. At first, he coached at Taipei American School (TAS). He later, along with parents and a few other coaches, founded International Soccer Club Taipei, which trained at TAS and was mostly comprised of the school’s students. This club was further expanded to include players from all around the world, and it has since been renamed Inter Taoyuan FC.

Oliver Harley
Coach
I have been in Taiwan for about 20 years now doing football. I’ve worked with kids, all levels: kids, teenagers, adults, men, women, at all different levels. It has been a good journey. I was a footballer myself for sometime. I played football in many countries. I played in the U.S. I played a little bit in Canada as well. I played here in Taiwan. I played in a couple of different places.

In 2023, he joined the non-profit F.C. Vikings as the head coach, leading the team to victory in Division Two, which is officially named the Taiwan Second Division Football League. The semi-professional team will now begin playing in the Taiwan Premier League for the first time in club history.

Oliver Harley
Coach
There is a lot to do because when you are a new team going up to the league, there are a lot of challenges. You have to get sponsorships, you have to find players. You have to get organizational things done. The training definitely has to change because it is at a different level. It also means more commitment from players, from the club because we train more hours. You will go from three, four days a week to five, six days a week, and then a game day.

Over the past 20 years of coaching football, Harley has witnessed the growth and transformation of football in Taiwan.

Oliver Harley
Head coach
I think Taiwan football has grown a lot in my 20 years here. I think it’s at a stage now where it can go to really professional levels to be getting closer to what the world stage is. But what does that take? It takes more commitment. It takes more commitment from players, from the community. It takes help from local businesses and the media to let people know that this is out there and this is happening. Taiwan has a lot of talent that deserves exposure. I think it is a good time for Taiwan football.

Having led the team to Taiwan’s semi-professional Premier League, Harley hopes to continue to mentor talented players and help football grow to an even more professional level in Taiwan.

For more Taiwan news, tune in:
Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-22

Study from NIH highlights the prevalence of sleep apnea among older people

Do you ever have insomnia? A new study from the National Health Research Institutes highlights the prevalence of sleep apnea among older people. More than half of people aged over 65 have sleeping trouble, and a large number of them suffer from sleep apnea. The disorder causes a person’s breathing to start and stop when they sleep. It can reduce the quality of sleep, leading to fatigue and other serious symptoms. But the majority of cases have it without knowing. The study emphasizes the need for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this common disorder.

Research shows that half the population over 65 has sleep problems. One main cause is sleep apnea. More than half of women over 60 have the disorder, and more than 70% of men. But many of them don’t even know it.

Cheng Wan-ju
National Center for Geriatrics and Welfare Research physician
Older demographics rarely exhibit hypersomnia symptoms, instead they tend to have sleep apnea. The most common scenario is actually to experience no symptoms, so the majority of cases are overlooked. Although it is highly prevalent, few people come into the sleep center.

Sleep apnea can raise the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, as well as cognitive decline and accidents caused by fatigue. It’s a big hazard for the health of older people. A research team from the National Health Research Institutes and Harvard University found that an unstable breathing style is the cause for most older patients of the disorder. That may mean they don’t snore audibly. This leads to different treatment avenues.

Cheng Wan-ju
National Center for Geriatrics and Welfare Research physician
If we give an older person a CPAP machine, and they can’t keep it on at night, the clinical physician may consider using some drugs to make their breathing more stable. Now we also have drugs which can increase the muscular function of the upper respiratory tract, and open it up here, which may improve their condition.

Hsu Chih-cheng
National Center for Geriatrics and Welfare Research director
This study has a very important significance, which is that it reminds medical professionals that when we come across patients with insomnia, we should not immediately prescribe sleeping pills. Insomnia can have many, many causes.

The results of the study have been published in prestigious international journals. Experts hope they will help patients and medical professionals to pay more attention to sleep apnea among older people, to detect the disorder sooner, and to find appropriate treatments for every patient.

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2024-02-22

New Taipei electronics warehouse catches fire, creating foul smoke

A warehouse fire in New Taipei has led to complaints about foul smells and poor air quality in the area. On Tuesday afternoon, an electronics warehouse caught fire and continued to burn through the night. The warehouse contained more than 7,000 lithium batteries, which released toxic chemicals into the air.

Thick smoke pours out of the building, enveloping the entrances to the warehouse. Firefighters spray water in an attempt to cool the inferno.

They keep spraying water, but the fire continues to rage. The building was aflame all through the night.

Yang Wen-te
Wanshun Borough warden
It’s all smoke inside. There’s plastic and paper, so there’s a lot of flammable materials. There’s nothing to be done about the smell. Burning plastic always smells bad.

The fire started at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the basement of a warehouse in New Taipei’s Shenkeng District. The warehouse contained a variety of electronics with more than 7,000 lithium batteries, which caused the fire to reignite over and over. Even when the blaze was brought under control, clouds of dense smoke continued to rise from the site, spreading the smell of burning plastic to nearby areas.

Cheng Da-wei
New Taipei Environment Protection Department
Air quality monitors in Xindian District detected particulate concentrations skyrocketing to 50 and 60 micrograms per cubic meter. After an analysis of atmospheric models, we concluded that the origin of these pollutants was the fire in Shenkeng District.

The fumes spread to nearby Taipei City, with Wenshan District getting the brunt. Downwind areas of Wanhua, Xinyi, Da’an and even Songshan reported smells. But Taipei’s Department of Environmental Protection says air pollution levels remained within a safe range.

Wu Sheng-chung
Taipei Department of Environmental Protection
Air quality metrics do not account for odors. It takes a very low level of particles to produce a smell. That is, even when there is a hint of an odor, our noses immediately pick up on it. But even if you do smell something, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the air quality is bad.

Yen Tzung-hai
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Clinical Poison Center
When lithium batteries catch on fire, they produce a gas called hydrogen fluoride, which is harmful to the lungs. Inhaled in large quantities, it can damage the lungs and cause respiratory failure.

A doctor says that in situations like the Shenkeng fire, it is best to keep doors and windows shut to keep pollutants out, and to wear a face mask so as to not inhale chemicals in the smoke. The Central Weather Administration says starting Thursday, northeasterly winds should help disperse the pollutants.

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Sun to Fri at 9:30 pm on Channel 152
Tue to Sat at 1 am on Channel 53

2024-02-21